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Friday, February 2 

How Is No One In Jail Yet?

A recent audit of cash-strapped Camden, N.J. school district's finances found it was paying an employee $130,000 annually — and he's been dead for more than three decades.
I have several questions about this story.
  1. Who has been receiving the $130,000 each year?

  2. Who overpaid for copiers by $900,000 and whose cousin owns that office supply company?

  3. Why has it taken three decades to notice a dead employee?

  4. Where is the outrage? If this had been a large corporation, Michael Moore would already be making a documentary. Since it's the hallowed institution of public school, we'll slap a few wrists and increase the budget even more to hire more people to watch the budget to make sure it's not being wasted.

  5. Why are the parents of students in Camden, N.J. not asking for a refund? $130,000 per year could have sent a dozen or so of their children to private schools each year, where they would most likely have received a much better education.

  6. Why does this story not talk about anyone going to jail? Again, if this were Enron or Haliburton there would be people calling for blood.

  7. Is the answer to a government institution wasting taxpayer money really to create another government institution to make sure the first doesn't waste money? See Department Of Redundancy Department


I used to work for a school system, and while I've never seen waste quite that egregious, I have seen some absolutely ridiculous expenditures. Usually it's in the name of having to get rid of excess cash at the end of the year so you don't lose that funding the next year.

But just think how much money our schools would have if we weren't spending so much on the war. I mean, these poor, cash-strapped institutions can barely afford to keep paying employees for three decades after their demise. With the proper funding, this employee could have been paid for decades longer.

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